Home, Less, Making

Date(s):

Sunday, November 1 from 6 - 9:30pm

Saturday, November 7 from 7 - 9pm
(seating is limited for this evening, please rsvp here.) 

Sunday, November 8 from 6 - 9:30pm

About

On behalf of Saint Francis House of Hospitality, artist Joshua Kent presents a series of collaborative performance events exploring the city’s current economic/political climate through the lens of shared communal meals. Showcasing the work of collective Lucky Pierre and other invited social practitioners, the program’s three iterations represent performative actions that investigate the process and politics involved with meal preparation and consumption. In response to the history of Saint Francis House, a site that provides hospitality to all persons in need, the series aims to remove the distinction between strangers and neighbors. Through highlighting the labor and acts of care that support daily life, "Home, Less, Making" creates space for artists and viewers to break bread, coming together around the table.

Please join us Saturday, November 7 at 7pm for a presentation of "Final Meals" by Lucky Pierre and Sunday, November 8 at 6pm for an enactment of history by Paul Durica. Both nights will feature a beautiful printed edition by Marc Fischer. All events are free and open to the public, with a meal to follow.

Seating is limited for the November 7th event. Please RSVP through Eventbrite here.

Location
St. Francis House of Hospitality
4652 N Kenmore Ave
60640 Chicago, IL
Phone: (773) 944-0613

How is the City your studio?

In direct response to the lack of supportive programming available, private citizens manage Saint Francis House as a community for individuals facing homelessness due to economic hardships. The site, which offers food and housing to any person in need free of charge, has operated in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood for 41 years. As a resident and worker of the community for the last four years, Joshua Kent grounds his immersive life practice in the daily realities of the site. With a studio housed in the attic of the building, the community is both the conceptual and physical edifice which structures Kent’s practice. "Home, Less, Making" opens up the venue to a wider audience as a space of both artistic investigation and relevant socially engaged labor.